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Warning Cases

St. Louis Warning Cases

Recovery for harm caused by inadequate labeling of unsafe products

There are many products that, though necessary and beneficial, can never be made entirely safe. These include everything from power tools to pharmaceuticals. To protect consumers from harm and themselves from liability, producers of inherently dangerous products are required to affix labels that adequately warn of the dangers these products pose. When a vendor markets an improperly labeled product that harms a consumer in a manner that could have been avoided with proper safety labeling, that vendor can be held liable in a lawsuit, just as if the harm had been caused by a design or manufacturing defect.

For more than 35 years, the DeVoto Law Firm has held producers of inadequately labeled products accountable for harm to consumers, thus improving the level of safety throughout the marketplace. Our St. Louis warning cases include dangerous drug interactions, electrocutions and propane and gas explosions. We have the knowledge and skill to advocate forcefully for your full recovery.

The parameters of proper labeling

What constitutes a proper or adequate label is often a question for a judge or jury. While manufacturers are not required to warn against “obvious” dangers, what is obvious to one consumer may not be so apparent to another. But when manufacturers produce a comprehensive list of every possible danger, the warning may be found inadequate because it’s so burdensome that no consumer could be expected to read it. If you need advice about a warning case in St. Louis, you need to speak to an experienced attorney who understands the standards set by government regulations and the industries themselves.

A system of regulation and voluntary compliance

Guidelines for product labels come from government regulations, case law and industry standards. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration writes rules for warning labels for prescription drugs, over-the-counter medication and food products. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is a nonprofit organization that provides accreditation for manufacturers in various industries and sets standards for safety labeling in numerous areas, including:

  • Appliances
  • Bottled water
  • Building products
  • Furniture
  • Drinking water treatment units
  • Electrical products
  • Food service equipment
  • Gas appliances and accessories
  • Personal safety equipment
  • Plumbing products
  • Sanitation products
  • Solar energy
  • Sustainable forestry
  • Swimming pools, spas and components
  • Windows and doors
  • Wood products

Contact a capable warning label law firm in St. Louis

If you or a loved one has been harmed by an inadequately labeled product, the DeVoto Law Firm can help in cases throughout Missouri. Schedule a free consultation and case evaluation by calling us at [ln::phone] or contacting our St. Louis office online. We’re available evenings and weekends and we make house or hospital calls when necessary.

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Testimonials

Tom has represented me on a couple of matters.. Two worker's compensation cases and the accidents that caused my work injuries. He handled my cases quickly and efficiently and although they were not big cases he handled them like they were important cases. If any of my friends or co-workers get injured, I always give them Tom's name.
- O.B.

I was in an industrial accident, stairway collapse, and Tom handled my case against the owner of the building. When the topic of settlement came up before the start of the trial the defense lawyer mentioned a small amount, Later, Tom and I were in the elevator with the defense lawyer and Tom looked at him and said, you're going down. Watching Tom try my case and object and control the evidence was great. The jury gave Tom every single penny that he asked for. Tom and I stay in touch. I call him Big Tom.
Alan C.